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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
Current
Nov 30, 2012 10:00pm PST
several decades has built strong relationships with city governments to the point where there is a large regulatory regime in most cities around taxis. in many cases you have regulators who feel their job is to protect the taxi industry. i had one regulator in new york refer to the taxi industry as their customer. so what happens then is that once it goes into that protection mode, innovation becomes very difficult. it may be why in so many cities that innovation around taxi around transportation is so gummed up. the rig heaters who are supposed to crack the whip end up becoming the protectors. even though it's hard, uber is completely legal, in the cities that we're rolling out and there are cities that we can't roll out where we're not legal like miami and vegas we can't roll out. there is that protection mechanism that makes it particularly controversial. >> so you say you're legal but a lot of these cities suggest otherwise. their regulators are sending out crease and desist orders almost on a daily base. impounding cars in washington, d.c. at one point. they're not allowing this tec
Current
Dec 12, 2012 2:00pm PST
of this country's labor movement. in 1960, flint was michigan's second largest city 200,000 people. it also had a vibrant middle class, it's public school system was a model for the nation and that was due in large part to the strength of its labor unions and the large number of manufacturing workers living in flint. they took over a factory and they didn't leave until they reached a deal with management. workers occupied several general motor's plants. not for a day, a week but for month -- actually for longer than a month for 40-consecutive days and it worked. they got bargaining rights, and 40-hour workweek and a minimum wage. they had 100,000 people turned out in detroit to show their support for the striking workers in flint 100,000 people. and yesterday, 12,000 people turned out in lancing, michigan to protest against the state's new right to work law. it's a devastating blow to the heart of organized labor in this country, and perhaps no one knows more about than that that garl dean blankinship. >> my father called home one night, he was working on the second shift.
Current
Dec 14, 2012 2:00am PST
. >> eliot: as well we should. editor at large of the atlantic, steve clemons president of ploughshares fund, joe cirincione. seemingly they're right back where they started. what speakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakak nobody knows disasters like comedians. >> new york, the high-tech resilient city. just don't get us wet. what the hell was that? >> that's from my upcoming benefit for victims of hurricane sandy. i booked the strongest, smartest comics i could find. my comedian friends and i will raise money to rebuild homes and lives one laugh at a time. >> awe damn, the lights are out! you know what? i'll watch a little television until they come back on. >> only on current tv. >> eliot: on the 18 -- only 18 days remain until we go over the so-called fiscal cliff and with congress once again heading home after another grueling two-day work week, president obama met once again with speaker boehner. while the president keeps talking about revenues, speaker boehner focuses on expenditures and it is hard to tell if any progress is being made.
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)